Dining

DU-PAR’S RESTAURANT & BAKERY

In 1955, Golden Gate founding partner and restaurateur, Tiny Naylor, brought his special brand of home cooking to Las Vegas’ most historic hotel and casino. Today, Tiny’s son, Biff, serves classic recipes with the same fresh, homemade quality. Du-Par’s serves the “Best Pancakes in America” (Esquire Magazine), “Best Pie in Las Vegas (Las Vegas Weekly Magazine), and was recently named one of the “Top Five 24-hour Diners in Las Vegas” …. This is great food without megaresort prices.
When Golden Gate partner Italo Ghelfi introduced shrimp cocktail to the casino scene in 1959, he started a Las Vegas tradition. Since then, we’ve served more than 40 million! Locals vote our shrimp cocktail “Best of Las Vegas” year after year!
Las Vegas’ Original Shrimp Cocktail is served in Du-pars and boasts a heap of ocean shrimp in a classic “tulip” sundae glass, served with our secret cocktail sauce and a wedge of fresh lemon. The price? Only $3.99!
Du-par’s is open 24/7.  For more information dial  702-366-9378.

 

DID SHRIMP COCKTAIL HELP DRIVE THE MOB OUT OF LAS VEGAS IN THE 1950S?

Well, let’s just say they are … connected.

Shrimp cocktail was introduced to the Las Vegas casino scene in 1959 by Italo Ghelfi, a restaurant/bar owner from the San Francisco Bay Area and a founding partner at the Golden Gate Casino. What brought Ghelfi from the Bay Area to Las Vegas’ most historic hotel and casino—and what did this have to do with the sudden departure of a notorious illegal gambling kingpin?

This Vegas story starts with Emilio ‘Gomba’ Giorgetti who controlled illegal slot operations, liquor sales and a number of powerful politicians in the Bay Area. In 1948, Giorgetti came to Las Vegas to form a partnership with Benny Binion at the Westerner Casino on Fremont Street. When the two men knocked heads over management differences, those differences were resolved in classic Vegas style– with the flip of a coin.

Binion lost the coin toss, but as fate would have it, he later moved across the street to the Horseshoe where he became—as Robin Leach would say—“Rich and Famous”. As for Giorgetti, the victory was short-lived. U.S. Senator Estes Kefauver came to Las Vegas to hold a nationally televised hearing on

organized crime in the old Federal Courthouse (now wonderfully restored as the Mob Museum).

Shrimp

At the time, television was new to the average American home and Sen. Kefauver’s live broadcasts of testimony by reputed mob bosses attracted more viewers than the World Series.

When Giorgetti was subpoenaed to appear before the Kefauver Committee, the negative publicity was so intense that he decided it was time to sell and get out of town. Like any smart, sophisticated mobster, he called his lawyer.

Giorgetti’s lawyer was Joseph Alioto, who later became mayor of San Francisco. Alioto called one of Italo Ghelfi’s partners to ask if

he wanted to buy a casino in Las Vegas. When Ghelfi saw the casino’s books, his jaw dropped. He ran a successful bar in Oakland with the longest bar west of the Mississippi (a distinction that now belongs to the LONGBAR at the D), but he had never seen numbers like these. He was ready to come to Las Vegas.

Ghelfi and his partners bought the Westerner from Giorgetti, then sold it for a profit just two years later. Ghelfi’s next stop was One Fremont Street, where he opened the Golden Gate Casino on the main floor of what was then the Sal Sagev (Las Vegas spelled backward).

There are volumes of original Las Vegas stories at this special address, ranging from the first telephone in 1907 (the # was “1″) to the drinking and gambling antics of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sammy Davis, Jr. during the Rat Pack era. The Golden Gate, quite simply, is the embodiment of Las Vegas history.

In this story, Italo Ghelfi, established a colorful reputation as a gaming pioneer and a beloved member of the Las Vegas community. In so doing, Ghelfi displaced a mobster and started a shrimp cocktail tradition that still thrives today. And that’s the connection!